Clothing Made of Knitted Rubber Bands

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Fringe is supposed to come back with a vengeance in 2020, though the degree to which the ongoing global pandemic will stifle predicted trends is still unknown. In decades past, it was associated with cowboy apparel, hippies, and outdated furniture from the 1970s, but it’s now being reimagined as “expensive, elegant, and dressy.”

Outfits from designer Rie Sakamoto's ultra-original Rubber collection.
Outfits from designer Rie Sakamoto’s ultra-original Rubber collection.

A new collection of bold, creative garments from Japanese designer Rie Sakamoto integrates fringe into various garments in surprising ways, all using the most unexpected of materials. “Rubber Collection” takes an object you’d never normally associate with fashion and uses it as the one and only component of a dress and shawl-style jacket: the humble rubber band.

Thousands of ordinary rubber bands are knitted together like more traditional fibers to create these ultra-stretchy orange garments. Sakamoto, a graduating student at Japan’s Tama Art University, knitted them all into

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Introducing Banding Together, a New Allure -Curated Collection Produced by Anywear

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As we were sharing with you the stories, and mental health struggles, of the frontline medical workers across the country who are fighting COVID-19, Allure wondered how we might help this group in a very practical, and of course beautiful, way. And then fashion startup Anywear came to us with an idea.

After seeing images of the skin irritation frontline workers are experiencing from wearing face masks during long shifts, Anywear consulted with medical professionals about exactly what might minimize their discomfort. They learned that headbands (and medical caps) with buttons to which masks could be affixed would help alleviate chafing and pain around the ears. Countless Zoom calls and several prototypes later, Anywear has launched The Banding Together Project.

<div class="caption"> A cloth face covering and headband set, with the palm tree manicure that inspired it. <a href="https://www.bandingtogetherproject.com/product/the-editors-knotted-set-1/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shop now." class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Shop now.</a> </div>
A cloth face covering and headband set, with the palm tree manicure that inspired it. Shop now.

At Anywear’s BandingTogetherProject.com, you can purchase a headband and cloth face

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Museums’ Money Machinations

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NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE D uring the ongoing Chinese coronavirus lockdown, a spooked leadership class put hundreds of millions of healthy people in quarantine on the basis of dodgy research by bureaucrats and airy academics. “Obey science,” which is an ideology and a superstition, replaced “use science,” which means taking data defining what we know and don’t know, looking at competing interpretations, balancing costs and benefits, and, in the case of a new disease, absorbing new data and new ideas.

What we have is a huge, real-life, real-time mess, though the science lemmings are still getting their hefty government and university paychecks. About those 33 million unemployed, most of them low-income workers? Boo hoo. A leading federal economics official just predicted that national unemployment will peak in June at 20 percent. When asked how long it will take to drop, he said, “Nobody knows.” Is that good policy? It’s where the

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Meet ArtActivistBarbie, the fearless funny feminist taking on a white male art world

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You may be surprised to learn that Barbie – lollipop-headed cultural icon and instrument of female oppression – has thrown off the shackles of the patriarchy’s archetypal dumb blonde to become a feminist art warrior blasting the hallowed halls of the world’s great art institutions. But it’s true.

Say hello to ArtActivistBarbie (AAB), whose modus operandi is small signs, big questions and a fabulous wardrobe. With her inviting call to arms, “Refuse to be the muse!” this fierce new incarnation of Barbie is helping to challenge art galleries and museums worldwide about their woeful lack of women and other minorities in their collections, and reluctance to consider the female gaze.

Thousands follow her on Twitter, enjoying her playful disruption and creative interventions which ask questions and raise issues about gender and the inequalities in many art collections. So, where did ArtActivistBarbie come from and where did she find those

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