our guide to this week’s best online art shows

ev3v4hn

A Garry Winogrand photograph of an opening party at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1969, part of Fraenkel Gallery’s ‘Dancing in the Street’ exhibition. – © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has released the largest and most detailed photograph to date of Rembrandt’s […]

A Garry Winogrand photograph of an opening party at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1969, part of Fraenkel Gallery's 'Dancing in the Street' exhibition. - © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
A Garry Winogrand photograph of an opening party at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1969, part of Fraenkel Gallery’s ‘Dancing in the Street’ exhibition. – © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has released the largest and most detailed photograph to date of Rembrandt’s 1642 painting The Night Watch. The 44.8-gigapixel image, which was created from a total of 528 exposures, allows you to zoom in on individual brushstrokes and even particles of pigment. rijksmuseum.nl

As Italy cautiously reopens from lockdown, David Zwirner’s podcast series, Dialogues, releases a meditation on Venice and Rome from the acclaimed poet and New Yorker writer Cynthia Zarin. (Excerpts from her forthcoming book, Two Cities, are available via the gallery’s website as well.) iTunes

The American artist Allan McCollum has amassed 1,200 screengrabs from film and television which, when the subtitles are displayed, offer words of comfort or encouragement. An Ongoing Collection of Reassurance features photographs of his laptop screen with phrases such as “You’re safe now”, “Don’t worry, it’s gonna be all right”, “It’s okay, it’s okay”, and so on. (Aside from the opportunities for support and sympathy, it’s also entertaining to work out which film or programme each screengrab is taken from.) allanmccollum.net

Gilbert & George are the latest members of the White Cube fold to take over the gallery’s Instagram feed, as part of a series of artists’ diaries, in which each artist posts a photograph or video a day offering an insight into their life in isolation. Tracey Emin and Antony Gormley have already taken part. Instagram

If you missed the dazzling Lee Krasner exhibition at the Barbican last year, or would enjoy another wallow in her paintings, Google Arts & Culture have an excellent selection of material relating to Krasner that includes filmed interviews with the artist, photographs, and both installation and close-up views of her work. GA+C

Among the many (many!) online viewing rooms out there, one highlight is this wonderful, idiosyncratic presentation from Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. For the Pleasure of Looking is a series of wittily-interpreted, themed exhibitions including Make Mine a Double (photographs of drinks, drinking, twins, sisters, two trees leaning into each other), and Dancing in the Street (dancers, street scenes, children, costumes). fraenkelgallery.com

Since lockdown, virtual reality has become one of the few means by which we can still enjoy art, though it’s often a poor substitute for the real thing. That may change with Hauser & Wirth’s ArtLab, which uses the latest technology (developed to help their artists visualise exhibition spaces) to preview its new space in Menorca, ahead of the real opening in 2021. The exhibition – accessible on a computer, smartphone or a VR headset such as Google Cardboard – includes works by Louise Bourgeois, Mark Bradford, Jenny Holzer, Luchita Hurtado and more. hauserwirth.com

Installation view, ‘Beside Itself’, created in HWVR picturing Luchita Hurtado ’s Face for Arcimboldo, 1973 - © Luchita Hurtado, courtesy Hauser & Wirth
Installation view, ‘Beside Itself’, created in HWVR picturing Luchita Hurtado ’s Face for Arcimboldo, 1973 – © Luchita Hurtado, courtesy Hauser & Wirth

To celebrate spring, and because bunnies are cheering, the Getty Museum in California have burrowed through their vast collection for all things rabbity. This charming online exhibition includes Victorian studio photographs and a Hans Hoffman oil painting from 1585 (based on Albrecht Dürer’s famous watercolour hare), along with Roman mosaics, illuminated medieval manuscripts and a William Eggleston photograph. blogs.getty.edu

In 1989, a young Frances Morris (now director of Tate) visited the late Louise Bourgeois in her New York home-cum-studio. Parts of the interview are viewable in a TateShots film on the museum’s YouTube channel. And if you’re in a Bourgeois frame of mind, I also enjoyed this short, in which Bourgeois demonstrates a party trick her father used to perform at the dinner table. YouTube

Next Post

Inside the Art-Filled Dhaka Home of Mega Collectors Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani

Click here to read the full article. On a late Friday afternoon in February, Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani—the mega art-collecting couple based in Dhaka, Bangladesh—had just placed their Haegue Yang commission, a tall, almost Seussian-looking sculpture titled North of the Mountain, by a floor-to-ceiling window on the fifth floor of […]