Why will none of London’s museums or art galleries reopen on July 4?

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The British Museum - Getty
The British Museum – Getty

Not one of London’s major museums and galleries will reopen on July 4, despite being given the green light to do so from the Government.

The latest easing of lockdown measures means that from next Saturday, cultural institutions, along with pubs, restaurants and hotels, will be permitted to welcome visitors, provided that they adopt a raft of safety and social distancing measures. 

While many hospitality businesses have been clamouring to reopen and quickly announced their plans after the Prime Minister’s statement, the capital’s cultural attractions have been much more reticent.

After the announcement, the Directors of the Tate, Science Museum Group, Natural History Museum, National Gallery, British Museum and Victoria and Albert Museum issued a joint statement, which offered no concrete plans:

It stated: “We welcome the Prime Minister’s announcement to allow the safe reopening of our galleries to the public this summer. We will

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Fendi Taps Artist Joshua Vide For a Beach-Ready Trompe L’oeil Collection

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Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy

From ELLE

If you’re a fan of both A-Ha and Fendi, you’re in luck. The Italian house just dropped their prefall 2020 collection entitled ‘California Sky’ in collaboration with Guatemalan-American visual artist Joshua Vides. The painterly collection is reminiscent of the Norwegian synth-pop band’s hit music video “Take On Me,” where a cartoonish look runs strong. Much like that bop, Fendi’s newest launch will only get better over time.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Fendi
Photo credit: Courtesy of Fendi
Photo credit: Courtesy of Fendi
Photo credit: Courtesy of Fendi
Photo credit: Courtesy of Fendi
Photo credit: Courtesy of Fendi

Vides lent his touch in the form of a scribbled Fendi logo while outlining the brand’s iconic Peekaboo bag, poplin shirt dresses, and even a pair of jeans for a trompe l’oeil effect. The monochromatic color combo is the collection’s main aesthetic, complemented by subtle pops of pastel pinks and tie-dye blue, inspired by the Roman sky. The collection launches just in time

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Stories behind murals, street paintings and portraits created in protest

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As thousands of Americans lend their voices to protests, artists are letting their brushes speak of racial reckoning.

They’re coloring streets with the words Black Lives Matter. They’re spray-painting walls with memorial images in rainbow hues. They’re illustrating fists, flowers and faces and sharing them on Instagram. They’re acting on an urge to create, spurred by the pain of George Floyd’s death and the global pandemic.

Although the term that many use for this kind of work, artivism, feels new, the idea that artists also serve as activists and leaders of cultural change has a deep-rooted history.

“Artists have always been at the lead of protest, resistance and hope in Black communities and other marginalized communities across the country,” says Aaron Bryant, the curator of photography and visual culture at the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

As a collective, artists illustrate and impact history. As individuals, they

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Los Angeles artists probe grief and violence in video art show from Guadalupe Rosales

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A still from a video by Guadalupe Rosales for "Channel Flip, Meet Me at the Edge of the Sun." <span class="copyright">(Guadalupe Rosales / LAND)</span>
A still from a video by Guadalupe Rosales for “Channel Flip, Meet Me at the Edge of the Sun.” (Guadalupe Rosales / LAND)

When Los Angeles artist Guadalupe Rosales began to organize an evening of performances for the arts group Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND), she envisioned an event that would be live and in person.

“Then COVID happened,” she says.

Bringing artists and an audience together into a tight indoor space was impossible, so Rosales went back to the drawing board, not only for ideas about how to stage the show but to reconsider the event’s themes.

“I didn’t want to organize a performance like nothing is happening,” she says.

Rosales began to think about her own work, and the ideas she has explored over time.

“I’ve been photographing at night in Los Angeles for maybe a year or two,” she says. “It’s the nocturnal life of Los

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